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5 Old School Makan Places For Mother's Day That Will Surprise Her With A #ThrowBack

Singapore’s oldest restaurants

High tea sets or brunch sessions are always solid choices – your mum certainly wouldn’t mind either. But this Mother’s Day, treat her to a meal that’s sure to bring back memories. Whether it’s the retro floor tiles or the spread of traditional dishes, here are 5 old school restaurants to make your mum feel young again.

And don’t go in assuming that these restaurants are anything like your downstairs char kway teow joint. Instead, take the chance to get all dressed up for a memorable Mother’s Day out.

1. Chin Mee Chin Confectionery

CMC Confectionery

Another oldie but goodie: Chin Mee Chin Confectionery is a local coffee shop that’s been around since 1925. With mosaic tiles in blue and white, this place has a range of pastries that your mum would’ve loved as a kid. There’s everything from custard puffs to swiss rolls, from fruit cake slices to curry puffs.

Wearing a Swarovski Pink Bangle at CMC Confectionery

Wearing: Luxury Bangle in Pink ($ 279)

But it’s most known for their Kaya Bun ($ 1.20), perfect for a simple breakfast to bask in the ambience of old-school Singapore. Instead of the kaya toast slices you’ll find at Toast Box or Killiney, the kaya here comes heartily slathered in toasted buns.

Kaya buns at CMC Confectionery

Wearing: Further Thin Bangle in Rose Gold ($ 199) and Eternal Watch ($ 799)

Enjoying breakfast at CMC Confectionery

Address: 204 East Coast Road, Singapore 428903 
Opening hours: Tue to Sun, 8:30AM – 4PM (Closed on Mondays)
Telephone: 6345 0419

Website

2. Shashlik Restaurant

Enjoying a Mother's Day meal at Shashlik Restaurant

Wearing: Latisha Choker ($ 279) and Latisha Strandage ($ 399)

Shashlik Restaurant is along Orchard Road, but tucked away in one of those ulu buildings that no one really ventures in. It was opened in 1986 by nine Hainanese migrants, who all got their Russian culinary skills by working in Russian cruise liners.

Getting dressed up with Swarovski jewellery at Shashlik Restaurant

Wearing: Latisha Choker ($ 279)

It’s worth heading down, not just for its nostalgic atmosphere, but to taste their Oxtail Stew ($ 32) and Borsch Soup ($ 7) – local takes on the classic Russian dishes.

Taking a photo of Shashlik's Baked Alaska

Wearing: Further Thin Bangle in White ($ 199)

Enjoying a meal at Shashlik Restaurant

Address: #06-19 Far East Shopping Centre, 545 Orchard Road, Singapore 238882
Opening hours: Tue to Sun: 12PM – 2:15PM, 6PM – 9:15PM (Closed on Mondays)
Telephone: 6732 6401

Website 

3. Spring Court

Enjoying a meal at Spring Court

Wearing: Latisha Pierced Earring Jackets ($ 189) and Crystalline Pure Watch ($ 799)

Spring Court’s been all over Singapore from East Coast to Chinatown, but the fact remains – it’s Singapore’s oldest Chinese restaurant. Dating back to 1929, Spring Court was probably the in restaurant of your grandma’s time.

People would flock to its original branch in Great World Amusement Park for weddings and other massive celebrations that needed a full-fledged banquet menu.

Trying the popiah at Spring Court

Wearing: Lollypop Ring ($ 299)

Now, their restaurant’s housed in a 4-storey building in the middle of Chinatown. Pull up a straight-back wooden chair and try their Popiah ($ 7.50), which is stuffed with huge filings of prawns, radish, and veggies.

Popiah at Spring Court

Wearing: Lollypop Ring ($ 299) and Crystalline Pure Watch ($ 799)

Address: 52-56 Upper Cross Street, Singapore 058348
Opening hours: Mon to Sun: 11AM – 3PM, 6PM – 10:30PM
Telephone: 6449 5030 

Website 

4. Islamic Restaurant

Nasi Briyani at Islamic Restaurant

Wearing: Sparkling Dance Flower Necklace in Medium ($ 299) and Sparkling Dance Flower Necklace ($ 199)

At a mighty 97 years old, Islamic Restaurant is the oldest on our list. It’s housed in a shophouse along North Bridge Road, and once you step through its doors, it’s like a blast to the past. Black and white photos are scattered across the walls and their tables are lined with printed tablecloths.

Getting dressed up with Swarovski jewllery for Islamic Restaurant

Wearing: Sparkling Dance Flower Necklace in Medium ($ 299)

Then, you can’t help but notice the wafting aroma of their Nasi Briyani. Order two sets for you and your mum – it comes with light and fluffy grains or rice, with a choice of Chicken ($ 10), Mutton ($ 11), or Fish ($ 11).

Enjoying a meal at Islamic Restaurant

Address: 745 North Bridge Road, Singapore 198713
Opening hours: Mon to Thu: 10AM – 10PM, Fri: 10AM – 1PM, 2PM – 10PM, Sat to Sun: 10AM – 10PM
Telephone: 6298 7563 

Website 

5. Yet Con Hainanese Chicken Rice

Enjoying chicken steamboat at Yet Con Hainanese Chicken Rice

Wearing: Stone Round Pendant in Pink ($ 189) and Stone Round Pendant in White ($ 189)

This Hainanese chicken rice joint has been around since the 40s – your mum’s sure to have wandered in here back in the day to get her fill of traditional chicken rice. In fact, Yet Con Hainanese Chicken Rice is so traditional that there’s no soy sauce when served.

Chicken Steamboat

Wearing: Further Thin Bangle in White ($ 199)

Otherwise, their Chicken Rice Steamboat ($ 12/person) is great for sharing, especially when it comes with seafood platters to cook in chicken broth. While eating, sit on one of their quaint wooden chairs and ask about her escapades when young – you’ll be surprised at how many exciting stories she has to share.

Enjoying a meal at Yet Con Hainanese Chicken Rice

Address: 25 Purvis Street, Singapore 188602
Opening hours: Mon to Sun: 12PM – 7PM
Telephone: 6337 6819 

Website

Restaurants for Mother’s Day

Dining at Singapore's oldest restaurants for Mother's Day

Rather than sipping tea at yet another hotel lobby, treat your mum to a meaningful meal at one of Singapore’s old school restaurants this Mother’s Day. Take the chance to ask after her favourite memories and then surprise her with a gift that’ll create plenty more.

Wearing Swarovski's sparkling crystals

Wearing: Sparkling Dance Flower Necklace in Medium ($ 299)

Sparkling crystals from Swarovski are sure to tug on her heartstrings, especially when their Mother’s Day collection has five distinct jewellery lines: Latisha, Sparkling Dance, Gabriella, Stone, and Live.

Wearing Swarovski's Eternal Watch

Wearing: Eternal Watch ($ 799)

Wearing Swarovski's Latisha Pierced Earring Jackets

Wearing: Latisha Pierced Earring Jackets ($ 189)

The Latisha Pierced Earring Jackets ($ 189) will be a huge hit with its drop-through pearls, while the Latisha Choker ($ 279) is an easy way to glam up any outfit.

Swarovski crystals for your mother

Wearing: Latisha Choker ($ 279), Further Thin Bangle in White ($ 199), and Latisha Strandage ($ 399)

From delicate monochrome strands with floral motifs to gleaming pavé bracelets, there’s something for every mum out there.

Find out more about Swarovski’s Mother’s Day collection here!


This post was brought to you by Swarovski.

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HomeKit-Siri-main

How To Find Bluetooth LE Range Or Signal Strength Between HomeKit Hub And The Accessory

By | April 29th, 2018

Sometimes we come across apps on the App Store that are originally designed to do one thing, but are actually perfectly usable for a task that the developer may not have envisaged when building it.

We think this is a prime example of what has happened with LightBlue Explorer, an app that appears to have been built with developers of Bluetooth LE accessories in mind but can actually be used by normal people like us.

According to the description of LightBlue Explorer, the app is designed to allow developers to connect to Bluetooth LE accessories, allowing them to read and write to characteristics as well as profiles. That’s all well and good, but it can actually be used from checking the connection strength or range of anything Bluetooth that connects to HomeKit to locating missing Fitbits, or anything in-between.

From the app’s App Store description:

Use LightBlue® Explorer to test your new BLE Heart Rate Monitor, temperature sensor, TI CC2540 Keyfob, Nordic uBlue, Panasonic PAN1720, etc. LightBlue® Explorer is also ideal for developers wanting to test the firmware of their own BLE peripherals.

However, as one App Store reviewer mentions, it can even be used for locating missing health monitors thanks to the way it shows signal strength.

I lost my fitbit and I found it with this even though the battery was SO low! This is free, no need to pay for the other types. You will see a list of Bluetooth devices it finds when you open it. Find the Alta or whatever you are looking for in the list. On the left there are some bars that will turn blue as you get closer – the more bars, the closer you are. I also used my fitbit app and saw which room it synced quickly with. Then I walked around the room and saw where the signal was strongest by number of blue bars. My fitbit had attached itself to a hanger in my closet – had totally given up on it as the battery was dead but gave it one more shot and found it – good luck!

For us though, it has been very useful in finding out signal strength of HomeKit-compatible Bluetooth LE devices to the nearest hub. As those of you familiar with home automation scene would already know, HomeKit-compatible Bluetooth LE devices can only be accessed and controlled if you are physically near to them and in range, or remotely if those devices are close to a hub such as Apple TV, HomePod or an iPad. You can use this app to see how far they are from your HomeKit hub by standing with your phone with this app running right next to your hub in order to make sure everything is within range so that they work nicely, both locally or remotely.

So there you have it. Whether you’re trying to find the sweet spot for that HomeKit-enabled hub or simply locating that missing keyfob, this may be the app for you.

(Download: LightBlue Explorer for iPhone or iPad from the App Store)

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Redmond Pie

Matsuya Dining: Omakase! Just feed me!

Fans of Chef Benson Teo will be happy to know that he has now moved to bigger premises where there is a proper kitchen to offer a full spectrum of cooked food aside from sushi and sashimi.

I first wrote about Ben when he was at Matsuya Sushi Bar.  It was his first venture after working at various Japanese restaurants for over two decades.

What I like about the place is the casual atmosphere where you can enjoy quality fish at a reasonable price.  By reasonable, I mean omakase sets which include fresh otoro, uni and Japanese wagyu priced between $ 100-$ 150.

I don’t know about you, but I find it more comfortable being served by a local sushi chef because of the language barrier I experience with Japanese chefs.  When you are sitting at a sushi bar, being able to hold a conversation with the sushi chef is part and parcel of the whole sushi experience.

I have always liked Chef Ben’s sense of balance for flavours.  His kani, negitoro and ikura don, is one of the best I have come across.  But at the old place, he only had a blow torch and a broiler so there was never a chance to try his grilled, simmered and fried dishes!  So, I was excited to learn last year that he would be moving to bigger premises which will have a proper kitchen!

The quality of the fish at Matsuya dining is very good.  It isn’t super high end like what they would use at $ 400 omakase places but it is more affordable while not sacrificing on quality.  The tuna and hotate for instance are fresh, not frozen and thawed.  Although he doesn’t specifically go for the top tier tuna like those that come from Oma, the quality is very good. I got to try his nama saba and it doesn’t have that off-putting fishiness. (Some people like it, but I am very sensitive to it) Hikarimono (silver skin fish) like saba turns fishy very easily and so it’s good gauge of freshness of the fish as well as the chef’s skills of preparing it for sashimi. 4.5/5

Chef showcased his hobayaki where he piled thin slices of well marbled Miyazaki A5 wagyu over a pool  of ginger flavoured sweet miso paste.  Needless to say, this was one of the highlight of our meal. The ginger miso paste was very well balanced and paired with the beef very well without overwhelming it. 4.5/5

The next course was an egglant dish where the flesh of the eggplant is first scooped out and then deep fried and added back to the shell with fried hirame (halibut) and scallops.  The fried items were then topped with a dashi based sauce with grated daikon.  It was good but I felt the sauce could have had a bit more punch. 4/5

The one dish I was ambivalent about was the tempura prawns and asparagus wrapped with nori.  It just didn’t resonate with me.  3.5/5

Our kakis were treated to a simmered kama toro (tuna collar) which is the kind of thing that was begging for a bowl of rice.  This is a special dish that chef serves whenever he can get his hands on the belly part of tuna collar.  It’s not available all of the time, so you will be very lucky if you get it as part of your omakase meal.  4.25/5

With the new dining concept, Chef has steered away from being a Sushi Bar to an omakase dining concept.  You can still sit at the counter and order a sushi course, but it would be a shame not to be able to taste some of the cooked food.  That said, the sushi is very good and if you are just looking for a sushi meal.

The final dish of the savoury course was a fish meat somen in clear dashi.  The noodles were satisfyingly crunchy and chewy at the same time.  The dashi broth could have been a little stronger. 4.25/5

For most Japanese omakase restaurant, dessert is almost like an afterthought.  Most would simply serve a slice of fruit just to end the meal with something sweet.  We were given a slice of cheesecake which was made in-house.  It was a sweet ending to a great meal but not something I can rave about. 3.5/5

Conclusion

Mid range pricing, mid to upper end quality.   Worth giving a try if you are looking for a quality Japanese restaurant that you can go back to on a regular basis.

Special Ieatishootipost Mother’s Day 8 Course Set $ 88+
(Valid till end May 2018)
1. Appetiser: Onsen tamago uni ikura with truffle oil
2. Sashimi:  Otoro, kanpachi, botan ebi, akami, hotate
3. Yakimono: Ebi Miso yaki
4. Nimono: Braised foie gras beef roll
5. Agemono: Sakura Ebi no kakiage
6. Anago rice bowl
7. Asari osuimono (clam soup)
8. Dessert: Tofu Cheese

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ieatishootipost

Beng Who Cooks – There’s a New Ah Beng in Town & He’s Cooking!

He may call himself the ‘Beng who cooks’, but he doesn’t really seem like an Ah Beng at all! Meet Jason Chua, the co-owner cum chef at Beng Who Cooks.

chicken-3

Jason got his moniker from his friends, who all claimed that he behaves like an ah beng. The straightforward 26-year-old was very willing to share his story.

During his childhood days, he would help out at his parents’ fruit shop. That was when he slowly realised that he had a passion for cooking. He then worked in a few restaurants in Singapore, grabbed an education in culinary arts, and opened his own hawker stall.

When asked why he wanted to start a hawker stall, Jason said that it was because it was the cheapest alternative to starting a restaurants or cafe.

The hawker shop is co-owned by two other Muslim partners. One of the two is Muhamad Ridhwan, a professional Singapore boxer.

His partners gave him quite a free rein on the dishes sold at the stall. This allows Jason to showcase his culinary talent fully. Jason said that he changes the menu every two to three months, to keep things fresh for returning customers.

chicken-4

The stall is known for their poke bowls, and Jason shared that he sees poke bowl as the modern version of chap chye png. He prepares and cooks a variety of different dishes, before assembling each dish on demand.

The ordering process is simple, and similar to the many other poke bowl eateries in Singapore. Ordering is done via an order chit.

The stall has two options — the Hawker Bowl ($ 6) or Towkay Bowl ($ 9). The Towkay bowl is basically an upgraded version of the Hawker bowl, which comes with a carbohydrate, a protein, two sides, a topping and sauce.

chicken-13

We tried the beef stew, which is braised for at least 24 hours. The meat was well flavoured and juicy, and wasn’t too stringy.

chicken-5

Another item under the protein section that might interest you is the Sweetheart Chicken Thigh, which is something very different from the usual chicken breast. The chunks of chicken thigh were tender, but were a tad under seasoned.

chicken-14

chicken-11

For sides, the fried tempeh was an interesting option. Tempeh is a very traditional Malay ingredient, which is nutty and savoury when fried. Other than that, the usual offerings of roasted cherry tomatoes, edamame and onsen egg can all be found.

chicken-8

chicken-9

Each bowl comes with a serving of sauce. The minty yoghurt, which reminded us very much of Indian raita, and Beng’s Salted Egg Sauce, an explosion of sweet and savoury notes, are great options. The addition of curry leaves in the salted egg sauce spiced things up a little as well. 

Jason is well loved by his neighbours, who poke fun at him and bring him food. He does his fair part by making poke bowls for them, and chatting with them. I guess that’s the traditional ‘kampong spirit’ that used to be prevalent in our tiny nation. It’s great to see that this spirit still lives on!

chicken-2

Address: #01-44 Hong Lim Market & Food Centre, Blk 531A Upper Cross Street, Singapore 051531

Phone: 9353 1428

Website: https://www.facebook.com/BengWhoCooks/

Opening Hours: Weekdays: 10am to 7.30pm, Saturdays: 10am to 3pm, closed on Sundays.

MissTamChiak.com made anonymous visit and paid its own meal at the stall featured here.

Justyn

An avid fan of the local food scene in Singapore, Justyn loves to recreate hearty hawker meals during his free time at home.

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Miss Tam Chiak

apple-ar-glasses

Apple Working On 16K Resolution VR, AR Headset That Works Without A Mac Or iPhone

By | April 28th, 2018

With iOS 11 and the ARKit framework that came with it, Apple became the biggest player in augmented reality almost overnight.

With apps and games that are now capable of taking advantage of everything that AR can offer, assuming you have compatible hardware, Apple continues to push what the technology is capable of.

A new report now says that Apple intends to take things to another level, beyond the iPhone and iPad, by potentially building its own AR/VR headset.

That report comes out of CNET, which reports that Apple’s headset will build on the company’s success in AR and include the next step, VR with the suggestion being that a headset would be able to combine both technologies and create one, super-immersive gaming experience.

The project is codenamed T288 within Apple, according to the report, with each of the headset’s two displays capable of 8K resolution. That would obviously mean that users would be staring at no less than 16K-worth of pixels, something that is mind boggling enough without the next point – this will all be self-contained, without the need for something like a Mac or an iPhone to handle the heavy lifting.

Previous reports on a potential Apple headset from Bloomberg mentioned a 2020 launch window, and that is the same timescale CNET believes, too. This is alongside another project ongoing within Apple that relates to a pair of AR glasses, with component makers already being lined up to allow the glasses to be made.

Despite the project being further down the pipeline than the full on headset approach, it’s still possible Apple will can the product before it makes its way to market. Apple throws many ideas against the wall behind closed doors; not all of them find their way into Apple Stores.

(Source: CNET | Top image is Microsoft HoloLens with Apple logo on it)

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Redmond Pie

Matsuya Dining: Omakase! Just feed me!

Fans of Chef Benson Teo will be happy to know that he has now moved to bigger premises where there is a proper kitchen to offer a full spectrum of cooked food aside from sushi and sashimi.

I first wrote about Ben when he was at Matsuya Sushi Bar.  It was his first venture after working at various Japanese restaurants for over two decades.

What I like about the place is the casual atmosphere where you can enjoy quality fish at a reasonable price.  By reasonable, I mean omakase sets which include fresh otoro, uni and Japanese wagyu priced between $ 100-$ 150.

I don’t know about you, but I find it more comfortable being served by a local sushi chef because of the language barrier I experience with Japanese chefs.  When you are sitting at a sushi bar, being able to hold a conversation with the sushi chef is part and parcel of the whole sushi experience.

I have always liked Chef Ben’s sense of balance for flavours.  His kani, negitoro and ikura don, is one of the best I have come across.  But at the old place, he only had a blow torch and a broiler so there was never a chance to try his grilled, simmered and fried dishes!  So, I was excited to learn last year that he would be moving to bigger premises which will have a proper kitchen!

The quality of the fish at Matsuya dining is very good.  It isn’t super high end like what they would use at $ 400 omakase places but it is more affordable while not sacrificing on quality.  The tuna and hotate for instance are fresh, not frozen and thawed.  Although he doesn’t specifically go for the top tier tuna like those that come from Oma, the quality is very good. I got to try his nama saba and it doesn’t have that off-putting fishiness. (Some people like it, but I am very sensitive to it) Hikarimono (silver skin fish) like saba turns fishy very easily and so it’s good gauge of freshness of the fish as well as the chef’s skills of preparing it for sashimi. 4.5/5

Chef showcased his hobayaki where he piled thin slices of well marbled Miyazaki A5 wagyu over a pool  of ginger flavoured sweet miso paste.  Needless to say, this was one of the highlight of our meal. The ginger miso paste was very well balanced and paired with the beef very well without overwhelming it. 4.5/5

The next course was an egglant dish where the flesh of the eggplant is first scooped out and then deep fried and added back to the shell with fried hirame (halibut) and scallops.  The fried items were then topped with a dashi based sauce with grated daikon.  It was good but I felt the sauce could have had a bit more punch. 4/5

The one dish I was ambivalent about was the tempura prawns and asparagus wrapped with nori.  It just didn’t resonate with me.  3.5/5

Our kakis were treated to a simmered kama toro (tuna collar) which is the kind of thing that was begging for a bowl of rice.  This is a special dish that chef serves whenever he can get his hands on the belly part of tuna collar.  It’s not available all of the time, so you will be very lucky if you get it as part of your omakase meal.  4.25/5

With the new dining concept, Chef has steered away from being a Sushi Bar to an omakase dining concept.  You can still sit at the counter and order a sushi course, but it would be a shame not to be able to taste some of the cooked food.  That said, the sushi is very good and if you are just looking for a sushi meal.

The final dish of the savoury course was a fish meat somen in clear dashi.  The noodles were satisfyingly crunchy and chewy at the same time.  The dashi broth could have been a little stronger. 4.25/5

For most Japanese omakase restaurant, dessert is almost like an afterthought.  Most would simply serve a slice of fruit just to end the meal with something sweet.  We were given a slice of cheesecake which was made in-house.  It was a sweet ending to a great meal but not something I can rave about. 3.5/5

Conclusion

Mid range pricing, mid to upper end quality.   Worth giving a try if you are looking for a quality Japanese restaurant that you can go back to on a regular basis.

Special Ieatishootipost Mother’s Day 8 Course Set $ 88+
(Valid till end May 2018)
1. Appetiser: Onsen tamago uni ikura with truffle oil
2. Sashimi:  Otoro, kanpachi, botan ebi, akami, hotate
3. Yakimono: Ebi Miso yaki
4. Nimono: Braised foie gras beef roll
5. Agemono: Sakura Ebi no kakiage
6. Anago rice bowl
7. Asari osuimono (clam soup)
8. Dessert: Tofu Cheese

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ieatishootipost

airport-base-stations-main

Apple Stops Manufacturing AirPort WiFi Routers, Existing Stock Will Remain On Sale While Supplies Last

By | April 27th, 2018

Two years ago, it was widely reported that Apple is internally discontinuing its AirPort WiFi routers range with no immediate plans for a product refresh. Apple at the time didn’t confirm or deny the rumor.

Earlier this year, the company officially started recommending its customers to get into mesh WiFi router game by selling Linksys Velop mesh WiFi system in both its online and retail stores. At that time though, the company said that our customers love AirPort routers and we continue to sell them while giving them more options with Linksys mesh system.

Whatever happened between then and now, Apple has now officially released a statement to a number of media outlets confirming that it’s discontinuing its AirPort line of WiFi routers and will be no longer manufacturing them. The company also confirmed that the existing units will remain on sale at Apple, and other channels, while stocks last. Apple also confirmed that it will continue to supply parts and service for existing AirPort models up to five more years.

We’re discontinuing the Apple AirPort base station products. They will be available through Apple.com, Apple’s retail stores and Apple Authorized Resellers while supplies last.

This isn’t surprising considering the fact that Apple didn’t update AirPort Express since 2012 and AirPort Extreme & AirPort Time Capsule since 2013. It does though leave a vacuum of sorts as some of the features which were offered in AirPort line aren’t seen in any other routers, such as built-in support for Time Machine backups with AirPort Time Capsule and AirPlay support with AirPort Express.

Following today’s announcement, Apple has also published a support document here outlining tips and recommendations for existing AirPort users on what to look for when moving to third-party WiFi routers.

We also have our own third-party AirPort alternative recommendation, which you can find over at: The Best Apple AirPort Alternative WiFi Routers.

(source: Rene Ritchie [YouTube])

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You can follow us on Twitter, add us to your circle on Google+ or like our Facebook page to keep yourself updated on all the latest from Microsoft, Google, Apple and the Web.

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Redmond Pie

Matsuya Dining: Omakase! Just feed me!

Fans of Chef Benson Teo will be happy to know that he has now moved to bigger premises where there is a proper kitchen to offer a full spectrum of cooked food aside from sushi and sashimi.

I first wrote about Ben when he was at Matsuya Sushi Bar.  It was his first venture after working at various Japanese restaurants for over two decades.

What I like about the place is the casual atmosphere where you can enjoy quality fish at a reasonable price.  By reasonable, I mean omakase sets which include fresh otoro, uni and Japanese wagyu priced between $ 100-$ 150.

I don’t know about you, but I find it more comfortable being served by a local sushi chef because of the language barrier I experience with Japanese chefs.  When you are sitting at a sushi bar, being able to hold a conversation with the sushi chef is part and parcel of the whole sushi experience.

I have always liked Chef Ben’s sense of balance for flavours.  His kani, negitoro and ikura don, is one of the best I have come across.  But at the old place, he only had a blow torch and a broiler so there was never a chance to try his grilled, simmered and fried dishes!  So, I was excited to learn last year that he would be moving to bigger premises which will have a proper kitchen!

The quality of the fish at Matsuya dining is very good.  It isn’t super high end like what they would use at $ 400 omakase places but it is more affordable while not sacrificing on quality.  The tuna and hotate for instance are fresh, not frozen and thawed.  Although he doesn’t specifically go for the top tier tuna like those that come from Oma, the quality is very good. I got to try his nama saba and it doesn’t have that off-putting fishiness. (Some people like it, but I am very sensitive to it) Hikarimono (silver skin fish) like saba turns fishy very easily and so it’s good gauge of freshness of the fish as well as the chef’s skills of preparing it for sashimi. 4.5/5

Chef showcased his hobayaki where he piled thin slices of well marbled Miyazaki A5 wagyu over a pool  of ginger flavoured sweet miso paste.  Needless to say, this was one of the highlight of our meal. The ginger miso paste was very well balanced and paired with the beef very well without overwhelming it. 4.5/5

The next course was an egglant dish where the flesh of the eggplant is first scooped out and then deep fried and added back to the shell with fried hirame (halibut) and scallops.  The fried items were then topped with a dashi based sauce with grated daikon.  It was good but I felt the sauce could have had a bit more punch. 4/5

The one dish I was ambivalent about was the tempura prawns and asparagus wrapped with nori.  It just didn’t resonate with me.  3.5/5

Our kakis were treated to a simmered kama toro (tuna collar) which is the kind of thing that was begging for a bowl of rice.  This is a special dish that chef serves whenever he can get his hands on the belly part of tuna collar.  It’s not available all of the time, so you will be very lucky if you get it as part of your omakase meal.  4.25/5

With the new dining concept, Chef has steered away from being a Sushi Bar to an omakase dining concept.  You can still sit at the counter and order a sushi course, but it would be a shame not to be able to taste some of the cooked food.  That said, the sushi is very good and if you are just looking for a sushi meal.

The final dish of the savoury course was a fish meat somen in clear dashi.  The noodles were satisfyingly crunchy and chewy at the same time.  The dashi broth could have been a little stronger. 4.25/5

For most Japanese omakase restaurant, dessert is almost like an afterthought.  Most would simply serve a slice of fruit just to end the meal with something sweet.  We were given a slice of cheesecake which was made in-house.  It was a sweet ending to a great meal but not something I can rave about. 3.5/5

Conclusion

Mid range pricing, mid to upper end quality.   Worth giving a try if you are looking for a quality Japanese restaurant that you can go back to on a regular basis.

Special Ieatishootipost Mother’s Day 8 Course Set $ 88+
(Valid till end May 2018)
1. Appetiser: Onsen tamago uni ikura with truffle oil
2. Sashimi:  Otoro, kanpachi, botan ebi, akami, hotate
3. Yakimono: Ebi Miso yaki
4. Nimono: Braised foie gras beef roll
5. Agemono: Sakura Ebi no kakiage
6. Anago rice bowl
7. Asari osuimono (clam soup)
8. Dessert: Tofu Cheese

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iphone-x-retail-box-1

Apple To Simplify Branding Of 2018 iPhone Lineup, iPhone 8 Successor May Be Named “iPhone”

By | April 26th, 2018

Throughout last year, as it became more and more clear that Apple would be launching three, rather than the usual two iPhones, we pondered just what that third device may end up being called.

As it turned out, we got the iPhone X, which, while a great name for an iPhone, does leave Apple with something of a naming issue moving forward. What will replace the iPhone X? Surely not the iPhone X2. Maybe iPhone XI?

Now, according to research analyst and Guggenheim Managing Director Robert Cihra, Apple looks set to alter its naming convention for devices that will be launched later this year. If his report is correct, then the mid-range 6.1-inch iPhone with an LCD screen will simply be called the iPhone, making it the first iPhone since, well, the iPhone. We mean the one back in 2007, obviously. You get the idea.

The story also goes that the high-end iPhone, a replacement for the iPhone X, will retain that X moniker with the larger 6.5-inch variant simply being called the iPhone X Plus. That would leave a 2018 lineup of the iPhone, the iPhone X and, of course, the iPhone X Plus, which has to be a much clearer proposition for new buyers than the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X naming convention we had last year.

This theory will see the iPhone X as we know it being discontinued rather than moved down the pricing structure, with a new iPhone SE replacement expected to arrive in the coming weeks.

The wildcard here, however, is the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus combination. It’s possible the pair will live on with lower prices than they are available for today, although that does go against that simplified naming strategy we were just talking about.

All in all, we will know more as the year rumbles on. Everything makes plenty of sense to us, though – we’re just not sure about that iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus. Can you really sell an iPhone alongside an iPhone 8?

(Source: AppleInsider)

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Redmond Pie

Matsuya Dining: Omakase! Just feed me!

Fans of Chef Benson Teo will be happy to know that he has now moved to bigger premises where there is a proper kitchen to offer a full spectrum of cooked food aside from sushi and sashimi.

I first wrote about Ben when he was at Matsuya Sushi Bar.  It was his first venture after working at various Japanese restaurants for over two decades.

What I like about the place is the casual atmosphere where you can enjoy quality fish at a reasonable price.  By reasonable, I mean omakase sets which include fresh otoro, uni and Japanese wagyu priced between $ 100-$ 150.

I don’t know about you, but I find it more comfortable being served by a local sushi chef because of the language barrier I experience with Japanese chefs.  When you are sitting at a sushi bar, being able to hold a conversation with the sushi chef is part and parcel of the whole sushi experience.

I have always liked Chef Ben’s sense of balance for flavours.  His kani, negitoro and ikura don, is one of the best I have come across.  But at the old place, he only had a blow torch and a broiler so there was never a chance to try his grilled, simmered and fried dishes!  So, I was excited to learn last year that he would be moving to bigger premises which will have a proper kitchen!

The quality of the fish at Matsuya dining is very good.  It isn’t super high end like what they would use at $ 400 omakase places but it is more affordable while not sacrificing on quality.  The tuna and hotate for instance are fresh, not frozen and thawed.  Although he doesn’t specifically go for the top tier tuna like those that come from Oma, the quality is very good. I got to try his nama saba and it doesn’t have that off-putting fishiness. (Some people like it, but I am very sensitive to it) Hikarimono (silver skin fish) like saba turns fishy very easily and so it’s good gauge of freshness of the fish as well as the chef’s skills of preparing it for sashimi. 4.5/5

Chef showcased his hobayaki where he piled thin slices of well marbled Miyazaki A5 wagyu over a pool  of ginger flavoured sweet miso paste.  Needless to say, this was one of the highlight of our meal. The ginger miso paste was very well balanced and paired with the beef very well without overwhelming it. 4.5/5

The next course was an egglant dish where the flesh of the eggplant is first scooped out and then deep fried and added back to the shell with fried hirame (halibut) and scallops.  The fried items were then topped with a dashi based sauce with grated daikon.  It was good but I felt the sauce could have had a bit more punch. 4/5

The one dish I was ambivalent about was the tempura prawns and asparagus wrapped with nori.  It just didn’t resonate with me.  3.5/5

Our kakis were treated to a simmered kama toro (tuna collar) which is the kind of thing that was begging for a bowl of rice.  This is a special dish that chef serves whenever he can get his hands on the belly part of tuna collar.  It’s not available all of the time, so you will be very lucky if you get it as part of your omakase meal.  4.25/5

With the new dining concept, Chef has steered away from being a Sushi Bar to an omakase dining concept.  You can still sit at the counter and order a sushi course, but it would be a shame not to be able to taste some of the cooked food.  That said, the sushi is very good and if you are just looking for a sushi meal.

The final dish of the savoury course was a fish meat somen in clear dashi.  The noodles were satisfyingly crunchy and chewy at the same time.  The dashi broth could have been a little stronger. 4.25/5

For most Japanese omakase restaurant, dessert is almost like an afterthought.  Most would simply serve a slice of fruit just to end the meal with something sweet.  We were given a slice of cheesecake which was made in-house.  It was a sweet ending to a great meal but not something I can rave about. 3.5/5

Conclusion

Mid range pricing, mid to upper end quality.   Worth giving a try if you are looking for a quality Japanese restaurant that you can go back to on a regular basis.

Special Ieatishootipost Mother’s Day 8 Course Set $ 88+
(Valid till end May 2018)
1. Appetiser: Onsen tamago uni ikura with truffle oil
2. Sashimi:  Otoro, kanpachi, botan ebi, akami, hotate
3. Yakimono: Ebi Miso yaki
4. Nimono: Braised foie gras beef roll
5. Agemono: Sakura Ebi no kakiage
6. Anago rice bowl
7. Asari osuimono (clam soup)
8. Dessert: Tofu Cheese

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ieatishootipost